National Feral Pig Action Plan

Victoria

Find out more about feral pigs projects taking place across Victoria.

This is a dynamic Hub. It will be continually updated to include additional programs and to ensure that its content is current.
If your program is not listed and you would like it to be placed on the Hub, or you would like to provide an update on your program, please Contact Us.

Please note: authorisation of content for a program is obtained prior to its inclusion into the Hub.

  • Indigenous Group
  • Hunting Organisation
  • State Government
  • Local Government
  • Industry
  • Landholder Group
  • Federal Government
  • Research
  • Conservation and Biodiversity

Statewide

Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP)

Location: Victoria

The Victorian Government’s Biodiversity 2037 strategy is managed by the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP), within Environment, Community and Partnerships, and a portfolio of projects are addressing this Plan, including two dedicated feral pig projects in Tatong (led by DELWP) and in East Gippsland (led by Parks Victoria). Feral pigs are also managed through DELWP’s Forest, Fires and Regions Division, which has six regions across the State. Their ‘’Good Neighbour’’ program supports legislative obligations for invasive species management by land managers. The program operates at the public-private interface to manage pest and weeds issues that neighbours to public lands experience. Many feral pig activities between landholders, DELWP and Catchment Management Authorities are linked in this program.

Parks Victoria

Location: Victoria

Parks Victoria is a statutory authority of the Victorian Government acting in accordance with the Parks Victoria Act 2018. Parks Victoria recognises the value and importance of working in partnership with Traditional Owners to manage parks and reserves in a culturally sensitive and ecologically appropriate way.

Parks Victoria is responsible for managing a diverse estate of more than 4 million hectares including 3,000 land and marine parks and reserves making up 18 per cent of Victoria’s landmass, 75 per cent of Victoria’s wetlands and 70 per cent of Victoria’s coastline. Victoria’s parks are home to more than 4,300 native plants and around 1,000 native animal species.

Parks Victoria works in partnership with other government and non-government organisations and community groups, catchment management authorities, private land owners, friends groups, volunteers, licensed tour operators, lessees, research institutes and the broader community.

The broad distribution of feral pigs in Victorian is largely known and the most susceptible assets that need to be protected from feral pigs is targeted for feral pig removal in accordance with available resources. Feral pigs are controlled using a range of techniques including trapping, baiting, ground shooting and aerial shooting.

In 2019/20 feral pig control programs were delivered in East Gippsland including the Alpine and Snowy River National Parks to protect flora and fauna recovering from the 19/20 bushfires. Barmah, Hattah-Kulkyne and Murray Sunset National park continue to be focus areas for feral pig control in the north west of the state to protect internationally significant Ramsar wetlands, riparian areas and wetland refuges.

Agriculture Victoria

Location: Victoria

Agriculture Victoria is building capacity and capability to provide best practice management support for feral pig management to private landholders through community led action. Whilst there are no networks of community-led groups facilitated by Agriculture Victoria to manage feral pigs, this is an area that is gaining support. The majority of activity (trapping, baiting, aerial shooting) has largely been on public land borders with private land.

Barmah National Park

Parks Victoria

Location: Barmah National Park, Victoria

Parks Victoria is a statutory authority of the Victorian Government acting in accordance with the Parks Victoria Act 2018. Parks Victoria recognises the value and importance of working in partnership with Traditional Owners to manage parks and reserves in a culturally sensitive and ecologically appropriate way.

Parks Victoria is responsible for managing a diverse estate of more than 4 million hectares including 3,000 land and marine parks and reserves making up 18 per cent of Victoria’s landmass, 75 per cent of Victoria’s wetlands and 70 per cent of Victoria’s coastline. Victoria’s parks are home to more than 4,300 native plants and around 1,000 native animal species.

Parks Victoria works in partnership with other government and non-government organisations and community groups, catchment management authorities, private land owners, friends groups, volunteers, licensed tour operators, lessees, research institutes and the broader community.

The broad distribution of feral pigs in Victorian is largely known and the most susceptible assets that need to be protected from feral pigs is targeted for feral pig removal in accordance with available resources. Feral pigs are controlled using a range of techniques including trapping, baiting, ground shooting and aerial shooting.

In 2019/20 feral pig control programs were delivered in East Gippsland including the Alpine and Snowy River National Parks to protect flora and fauna recovering from the 19/20 bushfires. Barmah, Hattah-Kulkyne and Murray Sunset National park continue to be focus areas for feral pig control in the north west of the state to protect internationally significant Ramsar wetlands, riparian areas and wetland refuges.

Bundoora

LAMP Study, AgriBio

Location: Bundoora, Victoria

AgriBio Victoria have been active in preparedness activities for an African swine fever incursion into Australia. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a field friendly method of detecting DNA or RNA of organisms of interest. It is similar in analytical sensitivity to a PCR, but run in the field it is suited to bad conditions with minimal training (e.g.40-400 virions).The team at AgriBio Victoria has validated the use of LAMP machines using liquid reagents to test for FMD and are now in process of converting to FMD freeze dried strips and rolling this out to District Veterinary Officers in Victoria and South Australia (20 machines now in the regions in Victoria and 3 in SA). As of 2019, AgriBio has provided a ASF LAMP unit for use in Dili, Timor Leste. This uses liquid reagents, though work to convert the test to use freeze dried strips is currently in progress. The Timor Leste work in 2019 found that the ASF virus could be detected in both saliva and faeces. The use of a faecal sample, collected from a recent feeding site, rather than a blood or saliva sample, would be very useful and more practical for ASF surveillance in feral pigs. More work is presently being done on this in Timor Leste. A new CSF LAMP has also been developed by AgriBio that appears to be working successfully in early trials. Further testing and implementation in Timor Leste, where CSF is endemic, is currently underway.

Geelong

Landscape Genetics – CSIRO & the Department of Agriculture Water and the Environment

Location: Victoria

This project, Landscape genetics of feral pigs in Australia, is being supported by DAWE and led by CSIRO. This pilot study aims to develop a methodology to enable a cost-effective delineation of sub-populations of feral pigs in mainland Australia. The mapping of sub-populations is informative and useful information to support planning of population control programs as well as inform surveillance programs of exotic diseases. The pilot involves sampling of approximately 200 pigs from northern (NT) and southern (NSW) populations and comparing the performance of tissue, blood and hair samples collected from feral pigs. Opportunities to refine the genotyping analytics to reduce testing costs will also be identified. Recommendations on potential scaling up to a national, phase 2 project will be made upon completion.

Heidelberg

Genetics Research – Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning

Location: Heidelberg, Victoria

Genetic profiling work to determine the population structure of feral pigs across south-east Australia is being undertaken at the Arthur Rylah Institute, a research facility managed by the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning Victoria, in collaboration with public land managers across Victoria, NSW and South Australia. This work is being conducted to determine whether populations are discrete and self-contained or whether individuals are dispersing to form new populations. Outcomes from this study will be used to guide management actions for populations that are spreading or eradicate discrete groups. A network of people (including public and private land managers and recreational hunters) is being established to provide tissue and blood samples for analysis as budget/capacity is not available for the project team to trap pigs. The budget for this project is $160,000 over two years, in addition to in-kind contributions by land management agencies to undertake control work and collect samples.

Lerderderg State Park

Parks Victoria

Location: Lerderderg State Park, Victoria

Parks Victoria is a statutory authority of the Victorian Government acting in accordance with the Parks Victoria Act 2018. Parks Victoria recognises the value and importance of working in partnership with Traditional Owners to manage parks and reserves in a culturally sensitive and ecologically appropriate way.

Parks Victoria is responsible for managing a diverse estate of more than 4 million hectares including 3,000 land and marine parks and reserves making up 18 per cent of Victoria’s landmass, 75 per cent of Victoria’s wetlands and 70 per cent of Victoria’s coastline. Victoria’s parks are home to more than 4,300 native plants and around 1,000 native animal species.

Parks Victoria works in partnership with other government and non-government organisations and community groups, catchment management authorities, private land owners, friends groups, volunteers, licensed tour operators, lessees, research institutes and the broader community.
The broad distribution of feral pigs in Victorian is largely known and the most susceptible assets that need to be protected from feral pigs is targeted for feral pig removal in accordance with available resources. Feral pigs are controlled using a range of techniques including trapping, baiting, ground shooting and aerial shooting.

In 2019/20, feral pig control programs were delivered in East Gippsland including the Alpine and Snowy River National Parks to protect flora and fauna recovering from the 19/20 bushfires. Barmah, Hattah-Kulkyne and Murray Sunset National Park continue to be focus areas for feral pig control in the north west of the state to protect internationally significant Ramsar wetlands, riparian areas and wetland refuges.

Melbourne

Notifiable and zoonotic disease surveillance in feral pigs in Victoria – Agriculture Victoria

Location: Melbourne, Victoria

Disease surveillance work is being conducted at a statewide level by Agriculture Victoria using samples obtained from captured feral pigs across a number of sites in Victoria. A total of 45 samples have been collected to date; outcomes from surveillance testing for Leptospirosis, Brucella and Influenza A has not yet been published due to the small sample size. Further sample collection from agencies involved in feral pig control is underway.

Murray-Sunset National Park

Parks Victoria

Location: Murray-Sunset, Victoria

Parks Victoria is a statutory authority of the Victorian Government acting in accordance with the Parks Victoria Act 2018. Parks Victoria recognises the value and importance of working in partnership with Traditional Owners to manage parks and reserves in a culturally sensitive and ecologically appropriate way.

Parks Victoria is responsible for managing a diverse estate of more than 4 million hectares including 3,000 land and marine parks and reserves making up 18 per cent of Victoria’s landmass, 75 per cent of Victoria’s wetlands and 70 per cent of Victoria’s coastline. Victoria’s parks are home to more than 4,300 native plants and around 1,000 native animal species.

Parks Victoria works in partnership with other government and non-government organisations and community groups, catchment management authorities, private land owners, friends groups, volunteers, licensed tour operators, lessees, research institutes and the broader community.

The broad distribution of feral pigs in Victorian is largely known and the most susceptible assets that need to be protected from feral pigs is targeted for feral pig removal in accordance with available resources. Feral pigs are controlled using a range of techniques including trapping, baiting, ground shooting and aerial shooting.

In 2019/20 feral pig control programs were delivered in East Gippsland including the Alpine and Snowy River National Parks to protect flora and fauna recovering from the 19/20 bushfires. Barmah, Hattah-Kulkyne and Murray Sunset National park continue to be focus areas for feral pig control in the north west of the state to protect internationally significant Ramsar wetlands, riparian areas and wetland refuges.

Snowy River National Park

Parks Victoria

Location: Snowy River National Park, Victoria

Parks Victoria is a statutory authority of the Victorian Government acting in accordance with the Parks Victoria Act 2018. Parks Victoria recognises the value and importance of working in partnership with Traditional Owners to manage parks and reserves in a culturally sensitive and ecologically appropriate way.

Parks Victoria is responsible for managing a diverse estate of more than 4 million hectares including 3,000 land and marine parks and reserves making up 18 per cent of Victoria’s landmass, 75 per cent of Victoria’s wetlands and 70 per cent of Victoria’s coastline. Victoria’s parks are home to more than 4,300 native plants and around 1,000 native animal species.

Parks Victoria works in partnership with other government and non-government organisations and community groups, catchment management authorities, private land owners, friends groups, volunteers, licensed tour operators, lessees, research institutes and the broader community.
The broad distribution of feral pigs in Victorian is largely known and the most susceptible assets that need to be protected from feral pigs is targeted for feral pig removal in accordance with available resources. Feral pigs are controlled using a range of techniques including trapping, baiting, ground shooting and aerial shooting.

In 2019/20, feral pig control programs were delivered in East Gippsland including the Alpine and Snowy River National Parks to protect flora and fauna recovering from the 19/20 bushfires. Barmah, Hattah-Kulkyne and Murray Sunset National Park continue to be focus areas for feral pig control in the north west of the state to protect internationally significant Ramsar wetlands, riparian areas and wetland refuges.

National Feral Pig Action Plan

Tatong, Strathbogie and Samaria

Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning & Parks Victoria

Location: Benalla, Victoria

A three year trapping project to reduce the impacts of feral pigs on public land in state forests and national parks in the Tatong, Samaria and Strathbogie areas across north east Victoria has just been completed. This resulted in 64 feral pigs being trapped and dispatched. DELWP are also working with landowners, especially those who adjoin public land, to better understand the level of impacts the pigs are having. Remote cameras and satellite tracking were used to inform feral pig movements. The project was funded through the Victorian Government’s Biodiversity Response Planning Program and involves Forests and Fire Management Victoria, Agriculture Victoria, the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority and Parks Victoria.

A feral pig control program focussed on decreasing habitat destruction of a range of threatened flora and fauna species is also underway with support from the Biodiversity Response Planning program in Tatong. This project is being led by DELWP in partnership with Parks Victoria, Devpement of Jobs, Transport and Resources (Agriculture Victoria), HVP Plantations and local landholders.

Warby Ovens National Park

Parks Victoria

Location: Warby Ovens National Park, Victoria

Parks Victoria is a statutory authority of the Victorian Government acting in accordance with the Parks Victoria Act 2018. Parks Victoria recognises the value and importance of working in partnership with Traditional Owners to manage parks and reserves in a culturally sensitive and ecologically appropriate way.

Parks Victoria is responsible for managing a diverse estate of more than 4 million hectares including 3,000 land and marine parks and reserves making up 18 per cent of Victoria’s landmass, 75 per cent of Victoria’s wetlands and 70 per cent of Victoria’s coastline. Victoria’s parks are home to more than 4,300 native plants and around 1,000 native animal species. 

Parks Victoria works in partnership with other government and non-government organisations and community groups, catchment management authorities, private land owners, friends groups, volunteers, licensed tour operators, lessees, research institutes and the broader community.
The broad distribution of feral pigs in Victorian is largely known and the most susceptible assets that need to be protected from feral pigs is targeted for feral pig removal in accordance with available resources. Feral pigs are controlled using a range of techniques including trapping, baiting, ground shooting and aerial shooting.

In 2019/20, feral pig control programs were delivered in East Gippsland including the Alpine and Snowy River National Parks to protect flora and fauna recovering from the 19/20 bushfires. Barmah, Hattah-Kulkyne and Murray Sunset National Park continue to be focus areas for feral pig control in the north west of the state to protect internationally significant Ramsar wetlands, riparian areas and wetland refuges.